1-2-emannuelless:
did-you-kno:

Source

sciencesoup:

Photosynthesis: Rubisco, C4 and CAM

Rubisco is the most abundant protein on Earth. It’s used to recognise carbon dioxide in the Calvin Cycle of photosynthesis and fix it to RuBP, so it’s incredibly important to the food chain on Earth—but it’s actually incredibly bad at its job.

It only…

alternative-pinup:

Alternative Pin Up http://lingerie-pinup.blogspot.com/
born-in-latex:

Latex Girl http://born-in-latex.tumblr.com/
espikvlt:

21st Century Succubus

espikvlt:

21st Century Succubus

(via grandiose-fevers)

espikvlt:

Goddess of Sodomy.

(via grandiose-fevers)

pennytrayshun:

mmmm very sexy!

pennytrayshun:

mmmm very sexy!

(Source: lustandlatex, via opejem)

latexcrazy:

Miss Yulia Lunatic im Latexkleid Mary Jane von Latexcrazy - thx to Fetish-Fotos.de

http://www.latexcrazy.com/Latexkleid-Mary-Jane.html

(via opejem)

beautifulcurve:

Romi & Raylene

beautifulcurve:

Romi & Raylene

(via g-g-g-girlz)

thenewenlightenmentage:

Proton Spin Mystery Gains a New Clue
Physicists long assumed a proton’s spin came from its three constituent quarks. New measurements suggest particles called gluons make a significant contribution
Protons have a constant spin that is an intrinsic particle property like mass or charge. Yet where this spin comes from is such a mystery it’s dubbed the “proton spin crisis.” Initially physicists thought a proton’s spin was the sum of the spins of its three constituent quarks. But a 1987 experiment showed that quarks can account for only a small portion of a proton’s spin, raising the question of where the rest arises. The quarks inside a proton are held together by gluons, so scientists suggested perhaps they contribute spin. That idea now has support from a pair of studies analyzing the results of proton collisions inside the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, N.Y.
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thenewenlightenmentage:

Proton Spin Mystery Gains a New Clue

Physicists long assumed a proton’s spin came from its three constituent quarks. New measurements suggest particles called gluons make a significant contribution

Protons have a constant spin that is an intrinsic particle property like mass or charge. Yet where this spin comes from is such a mystery it’s dubbed the “proton spin crisis.” Initially physicists thought a proton’s spin was the sum of the spins of its three constituent quarks. But a 1987 experiment showed that quarks can account for only a small portion of a proton’s spin, raising the question of where the rest arises. The quarks inside a proton are held together by gluons, so scientists suggested perhaps they contribute spin. That idea now has support from a pair of studies analyzing the results of proton collisions inside the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, N.Y.

Continue Reading

spacewatching:

The transporter carries the 363-foot-high Apollo 12 Saturn V space vehicle from the VAB’s High Bay 3 at the start of the 3.5 mile rollout to Launch Complex 39A today. The transporter carried the 12.8 million pound load along the crawlerway at speeds under one mile per hour.

spacewatching:

The transporter carries the 363-foot-high Apollo 12 Saturn V space vehicle from the VAB’s High Bay 3 at the start of the 3.5 mile rollout to Launch Complex 39A today. The transporter carried the 12.8 million pound load along the crawlerway at speeds under one mile per hour.