projecthabu:

     The contour of this F-5E’s nose and fuselage was modified by Northrop-Grumman, to shape the sonic boom that emanates from it, reducing its intensity. The program, called the Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration, was a joint effort between NASA, Northrop-Grumman and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

     After this modified boom was recorded thousands of times, using an F-15B as a close-up chase aircraft, a Blanik L-23 Glider from afar, and an array of 42 sensors on the ground, the data showed that the noise level of the modified boom was 1/3 less intense than one emitting from an unmodified F-5E.

     This interesting R&D aircraft can be viewed at the Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum in Titusville, Florida, just outside the gate of Kennedy Space Center.

(via astro-stoner)

loungeoflust:

naughtynp317:

LOVE

michperry so no to her if you can💋💋

loungeoflust:

naughtynp317:

LOVE

michperry so no to her if you can💋💋

(Source: lostinwonderloveandlust, via loungeoflust)

themagnificentunknown:

lickystickypickyshe:

In an ongoing series on hybridizing fruit trees, Syracuse University sculptor Sam Van Aken’s Tree of 40 Fruit is true to its name. Most of the year, it looks pretty ordinary, but in the spring, the tree blossoms display various tones of pink, crimson, and white. Then, from July through October, it bears 40 different types of stone fruit, including almonds, apricots, cherries, nectarines, peaches, and plums. 
The feat is accomplished by grafting together several different varieties, including native fruit, heirlooms, and antiques, some of which are centuries-old, Aken tells Epicurious. 
His main source is an orchard at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, which he leased when he heard the orchard was to be torn down. After developing a timeline of when each of the 250 varieties blossom in relation to each other, he would graft a few onto the root structure of a single tree. When his “working tree” was about two years old, he would add more varieties onto the tree as separate branches — a technique called “chip grafting,” Science Alert explains. A sliver that includes a bud is inserted into an incision in the working tree and then taped in place. After it heals over the winter, the branch becomes just another normal branch on the tree, to be pruned as usual.
So far, 16 of these Trees of 40 Fruit have been grown, each taking about five years. He picked stone fruits because they’ve got a lot of diversity and they’re inter-compatible. And a bit of garlic and peppermint repellents keep deer away. 
“By grafting these different varieties onto the tree in a certain order I can essentially sculpt how the tree is to blossom,” he says. “I’ve been told by people that have [a tree] at their home that it provides the perfect amount and perfect variety of fruit.”

I want one very much!

themagnificentunknown:

lickystickypickyshe:

In an ongoing series on hybridizing fruit trees, Syracuse University sculptor Sam Van Aken’s Tree of 40 Fruit is true to its name. Most of the year, it looks pretty ordinary, but in the spring, the tree blossoms display various tones of pink, crimson, and white. Then, from July through October, it bears 40 different types of stone fruit, including almonds, apricots, cherries, nectarines, peaches, and plums. 

The feat is accomplished by grafting together several different varieties, including native fruit, heirlooms, and antiques, some of which are centuries-old, Aken tells Epicurious

His main source is an orchard at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, which he leased when he heard the orchard was to be torn down. After developing a timeline of when each of the 250 varieties blossom in relation to each other, he would graft a few onto the root structure of a single tree. When his “working tree” was about two years old, he would add more varieties onto the tree as separate branches — a technique called “chip grafting,” Science Alert explains. A sliver that includes a bud is inserted into an incision in the working tree and then taped in place. After it heals over the winter, the branch becomes just another normal branch on the tree, to be pruned as usual.

So far, 16 of these Trees of 40 Fruit have been grown, each taking about five years. He picked stone fruits because they’ve got a lot of diversity and they’re inter-compatible. And a bit of garlic and peppermint repellents keep deer away. 

“By grafting these different varieties onto the tree in a certain order I can essentially sculpt how the tree is to blossom,” he says. “I’ve been told by people that have [a tree] at their home that it provides the perfect amount and perfect variety of fruit.”

I want one very much!

(Source: iflscience.com, via astro-stoner)

(Source: fredtvleila, via mister-pyro)

thenewenlightenmentage:

Mysterious molecules in space
Over the vast, empty reaches of interstellar space, countless small molecules tumble quietly though the cold vacuum. Forged in the fusion furnaces of ancient stars and ejected into space when those stars exploded, these lonely molecules account for a significant amount of all the carbon, hydrogen, silicon and other atoms in the universe. In fact, some 20 percent of all the carbon in the universe is thought to exist as some form of interstellar molecule.
Many astronomers hypothesize that these interstellar molecules are also responsible for an observed phenomenon on Earth known as the “diffuse interstellar bands,” spectrographic proof that something out there in the universe is absorbing certain distinct colors of light from stars before it reaches the Earth. But since we don’t know the exact chemical composition and atomic arrangements of these mysterious molecules, it remains unproven whether they are, in fact, responsible for the diffuse interstellar bands.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Mysterious molecules in space

Over the vast, empty reaches of interstellar space, countless small molecules tumble quietly though the cold vacuum. Forged in the fusion furnaces of ancient stars and ejected into space when those stars exploded, these lonely molecules account for a significant amount of all the carbon, hydrogen, silicon and other atoms in the universe. In fact, some 20 percent of all the carbon in the universe is thought to exist as some form of interstellar molecule.

Many astronomers hypothesize that these  are also responsible for an observed phenomenon on Earth known as the “diffuse interstellar bands,” spectrographic proof that something out there in the universe is absorbing certain distinct colors of light from stars before it reaches the Earth. But since we don’t know the exact chemical composition and atomic arrangements of these mysterious , it remains unproven whether they are, in fact, responsible for the diffuse interstellar bands.

Continue Reading

born-in-latex:

Latex Girl http://shiny-dress-fashion.blogspot.com/
officialrubberdoll:

Cum party with me this Sat in Vegas! I’ll be performing two shows at The Crimson Fetish Ball! @Radiant_Inc #rubberdoll #whatsyourfetishtour

officialrubberdoll:

Cum party with me this Sat in Vegas! I’ll be performing two shows at The Crimson Fetish Ball! @Radiant_Inc #rubberdoll #whatsyourfetishtour

domusify:

Sarai IX by ~ValCarpenter
classyfemdomuniverse:

A classy female domination blog

classyfemdomuniverse:

A classy female domination blog

(Source: veronicasview, via bakertami)